Gourmet, Out Of The Box, Uji City — September 8, 2015 at 7:13 PM

Yakiniku at Kaiun-tei in Uji, Kyoto.

by
ime for grilling your meat, yum, yum at Kaiun-tei (海雲亭), a Korean Yakiniku shop.

ime for grilling your meat, yum, yum at Kaiun-tei (海雲亭), a Korean Yakiniku shop.

In search of a Yakiniku:

It has been raining in Kyoto for the past several days and a typhoon is on its way, Etau is number 18. The summer heat has sub-sided and with it the quest for eating warmer tasting foods. Todays lunch choice was Yakiniku (焼き肉) as we set out to find a suitable diner near where we live. We found such a place on Rt 69 Makishimacho, Uji, Kyoto Prefecture. Kaiun-tei (海雲亭) is a Korean restaurant with a three more restaurants in Kyoto.

Yakiniku, original Korean food:

First we were served a Entrée dish of salad and different small appetisers. Then came four different kinds of beef of karubi – short ribs without bones-, rōsu – loin and chuck slices- and harami – tender meat around the diaphragm. Of course yummy hot white rice was served along with a wakame soup. We ordered some extra cabbage, radish and cucumber kimchi. All was served on beautiful plates, I just had some trouble with the Korean style chop sticks, they are made of stainless steel, a bit slippery.

Musings about Yakiniku:

Four different types of meat at Kaiun-tei (海雲亭), a Korean Yakiniku shop.

Four different types of meat at Kaiun-tei (海雲亭), a Korean Yakiniku shop.

I like Yakiniku and often go and have some and I was surprised to find that it has a bit of a controversial issue to it. It seems that there was a dispute between Korea and Japan over its origin. Wikipedia says the following on the subject: “In Japan the origin has become a subject of debate, though it is conventionally considered to be Korean cuisine. In 2002 the NHK program NHK Ningen Kouza (NHK Humanity Lecture) stated: “While some tend to think that yakiniku came from Korea, it was born in post war Japan.” Yet there are those who say that while yakiniku may have its beginnings in Japan, they believe it was first made by Zainichi Koreans (long-term Korean residents living in Japan), and should therefore be considered Korean cuisine.” Wikipedia on Yakiniku:

Entrée dish at Kaiun-tei (海雲亭), a Korean Yakiniku shop.

Entrée dish at Kaiun-tei (海雲亭), a Korean Yakiniku shop.

Yakiniku Day:

Did you know that there is a “ Yakiniku Day”. In 1993, the All Japan Yakiniku Association proclaimed 29 August as official “Yakiniku Day” (yakiniku no hi), a form of goroawase (numerical wordplay), as the date 8月29 can be (roughly) read as ya-(tsu)ki-ni-ku (8 = ya, 2 = ni, 9 = ku).

See all pictures here
Wikipedia on Kimchi:
Kaiun-tei HP

Todays simple lunch at Kaiun-tei (海雲亭) Makishimacho, Uji, Kyoto Prefecture, a Korean Yakiniku shop. It’s on Rt 69 just before the Keiji By-pass. It was quite nice and tasty and if you are in the vicinity highly recommended.

Todays simple lunch at Kaiun-tei (海雲亭) Makishimacho, Uji, Kyoto Prefecture, a Korean Yakiniku shop. It’s on Rt 69 just before the Keiji By-pass. It was quite nice and tasty and if you are in the vicinity highly recommended.


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